Tag Archives: Jamsetji Tata

Back in baby’s arms

14 June, 2017
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Statues: Esplanade House (1887)
Waudby Road, Fort.

When Busy strayed on Sunday evening from the Breach and Sailor with the white star on his breast went missing at Khetwady, their owners turned to the Bombay press.

‘Dog Lost’, ‘Stolen or Gone Astray’, notices were published on the front page. A handsome reward was promised on the dog’s return.

Yet often in the notices no address was given to which the dog could be returned. Only the owner’s name was mentioned. Why so?

The world encompassed by the daily press of the 1860s was so small, the citizens that featured so familiar, that the front page of the paper read like a Facebook feed. Newspaper offices themselves often served as the first port of call so that Busy was as likely to be escorted back to the Bombay Gazette office as she was to her owner Mr W. Trevor Roper’s arms.

This post is in memory of Oscar Parmar who strayed at midnight on 31st May from Babulnath Road.

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A better story

10 December, 2015
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Windows: Taj Mahal Palace Hotel (1903)

Apollo Bunder.

Miss Bombaywalla would like to butter up those constituents bitter about the last post on Mr Tata & the Taj with a better story on Mr Tata’s motives:

Historians Sharada Dwivedi and Charles Allen explain that Jamsetji Tata envisioned the Taj as an enterprise that would boost the morale and landscape of Bombay which was still recovering from a devastating bubonic plague (1896-1900).

The Taj was a symbol of the restored health and confidence of Bombay as a whole. An indigenous enterprise, the newest marker on the city skyline, the Taj welcomed advancing ships and their passengers to its gates as much as it did to the restored city.

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Welcome to the glorious Esplanade House

27 March, 2015
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Interiors: Esplanade House (1887)
Waudby Road, Fort.

Esplanade House, the palatial residence of industrialist Jamsetji Tata (1839-1904) has been restored to its former glory.

The painstaking restoration work, which took over a decade, was carried out by conservation architect Vikas Dilawari and was funded by the current owners of the building, the R. D. Sethna Scholarship Fund.

Our next photos series will focus on the intricate tiling patterns found on the various floors of the mansion.

Photos courtesy Jasmine Driver for Parsiana magazine.

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