Tag Archives: Hersh Acharya

I want to hold your hand

28 June, 2013
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SS-F2813-Boundary02

Boundaries: Marine Drive (1940)
(presently Netaji Subhaschandra Bose Marg).

Public displays of affection (PDA) in 20th c Bombay were most common between men. Men holding hands or strolling the streets arm in arm were a regular sight. These roadside romeos were not necessarily gay. In fact, homosexual, like hetrosexual couples in Bombay, for the most part, stayed awkwardly apart in public.

Now that the Washingtonwallas have given a thumbs up to gay couples, Bombaywallas might follow.

The photograph is shot by Hersh Acharya.

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No Malabar Hillbillies these

24 June, 2013
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Banganga (1127 A.D.)

Staircases: Banganga (1127 A.D.)

Walkeshwar, Malabar Hill.

The residents of Malabar Hill were among the earliest in Bombay to benefit from home delivery services. In the 1800’s piano tuners and meat suppliers did the rounds of the private houses that lined the steep and ill kept roads in the locality.

Last week the residents of Malabar Hill were informed that Dilip Lande, group leader of the Maharashtra Navnirman Sena (MNS), has proposed to rename the area Ramnagari, after the god Ram, a very early resident of the locality. “The Malabar Hill area is a religious place for Hindus and has some very old temples. Even Shri Ram stayed there while he was on his way to find Sita. So I feel the name should be changed,” he said.

The photograph is shot by Hersh Acharya.

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Come fly with me

17 June, 2013
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Windows: Air India Building (1974)
Nariman Point.

The iconic Air India Building, designed by the American architect John Burgee, is the most strikingly modern symbol of the national carrier. It is surprising choice of structural design given how the other branding of the airline- the delightful turbaned mascot, the Maharajah, the sari-clad airhostesses and the in-flight Indian music, meals and movies- reflects a more traditional, national style.

Have a look at our gallery of photos above, shot by Hersh Acharya. The Air India Building is lit in green in the last shot.

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Sitting on the dock of the bay

14 June, 2013
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Marine Drive

Boundaries: Marine Drive (1940)

(presently Netaji Subhaschandra Bose Marg).

Sitting by the sea is a relatively recent recreational activity in Bombay. In the 1800’s, the popular forms of public pastime were chilling in the Maidan, the grassy expanse that surrounded the Fort settlement, and for the upwardly mobile, drives by the sea front in horse drawn carriages and buggies.

The monsoons make visiting Marine Drive all the more exciting.

This awesome photograph is shot by Hersh Acharya.

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Hey big spenders

3 June, 2013
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David Sassoon Library and Reading Room (1870)

Façade: David Sassoon Library & Reading Room
(1870) Esplanade Road (presently Mahatma Gandhi Road).

David Sassoon was the foremost Jewish sethia in 19th century Bombay. The term sethia refers to the class of merchant princes who were among the most powerful citizens. Their wealth, acquired through trade, was spent on public philanthropy and institutions as well as on maintaining lifestyles often befitting a prince.

Bombay’s leading sethias were a cosmopolitan mix – Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy (1st Baronet), a Parsi, Jugonnath Sunkersett, a Marathi of the Sonar caste, Mahomed Ally Rogay, a Konkani Muslim.

Photograph courtesy Hersh Acharya.

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