Tag Archives: Fort

Oh, no! Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya

1 January, 2017
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Flooring: Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya (1970)
Sheri House, Gunbow Street, Fort (presently Rustom Sidhwa Marg).

It is sad to see that Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya, a popular eatery in the Fort, has changed its flooring from the classic grey and black kota and cadappa stone combination to these slabs of artificial marble.

Checkered grey and black flooring linked several affordable eateries across the city— Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya with Meher Cold Drink House on the same street in the Fort, and Crown Bakery Stores & Restaurant in Mahim.

In the course of 2016, the flooring of Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya was thoughtlessly replaced and Crown Bakery was shut down to make way for the new metro line. That leaves Meher Cold Drink House and a few other eateries to remind us of patterns across the city that were once ubiquitous.

Thanks to Mustansir Dalvi for his assistance with this post.

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Two hotels, two Pestonjees & a fire

2 December, 2016
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British-Hotel-Lane

Signage: British Hotel Lanemassive fire in the lane has brought its name back in the spotlight.

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Sir JJ’s gift rooster?

28 November, 2016
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Motifs: Sir J.J. College of Architecture

78/3 Hornby Road (presently D.N. Road).

Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy’s gifts included hospitals, schools, animal shelters and museums and donations to innumerable charitable causes across the globe. He was the first Indian to be conferred a knighthood and baronetcy, in 1843 and 1858 respectively. The baronetcy possibly dulled the prospects of large-scale philanthropic activity by subsequent generations of the family. Descendants were required to wait to inherit the title at the death of their father, rather than actively work towards acquiring it.

Jejeebhoy died in 1859, a few years before the Fort walls were demolished to create a new city centre. His gifts were built on plots of land in areas like Byculla and Bhuleshwar. Today they seem conspicuous by their absence in the Fort.

On the other hand sethia David Sassoon’s legacy is imprinted in the Fort, despite his death in 1864, the year the Fort walls were finally demolished. His ambitious son Albert ensured that the institute his father had recently funded, was built on a prominent plot in the new city centre.

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Esplanade Emergency

11 September, 2016
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Interiors: Lady Willingdon Building for the Parsi Ambulance Division (1932)

1 Esplanade Road, Fort (presently M. G. Road).

Though located at 1 Esplanade Road, the Lady Willingdon Building for the Parsi Ambulance Division was in fact the last of the great medical institutions to be built on the Esplanade.

Once the grassy expanse that surrounded the Fort, the Esplanade was developed as part of the new city centre after the Fort walls had been destroyed in the 1860s.

By the 1890s, the Esplanade was dotted with medical institutions catering to women- the Bomanjee Edaljee Allbless Obstetric Hospital (1890), the Parsee Lying-in Hospital (1895) and the Pestanjee Hormusjee Cama Hospital for Women and Children (1896).

Three decades later, in naming the facility of the Parsi Ambulance Division, Lady Willingdon Building, the prominence of women on the promenade continued.

Hashim Badani shoots effortlessly on an emergency visit.

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The curious case of cutting chai

7 October, 2013
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Pop-up: Kala Ghoda Arts Festival

Pop-up: Kala Ghoda Arts Festival

2012, Kala Ghoda, Fort.

Justice Gautam Patel of the Bombay High Court recently ordered the police to drop the case against Vijay Patil, arrested in Kolhapur one morning for drinking chai (tea) in a suspicious manner.
“We were unaware that the law required anyone to give an explanation for having tea, whether in the morning, noon or night. One might take tea in a variety of ways, not all of them always elegant or delicate, some of them perhaps even noisy. But we know of no way to drink tea ‘suspiciously’…And while cutting chai is permissible, now even fashionable, cutting corners with the law is not.” Justice Patel ruled.

Hersh Acharya cuts his chai glasses but rigorously keeps the law.

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