Category Archives: Motifs

Saal Mubarak & Navroze Mubarak

21 March, 2017
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Bombaywala logo-4thAnniversary

Motifs: Bombaywalla

On Navroze Day, we turn 4! We are excited to announce that Bombaywalla will soon be made into a company which will conduct walks through Bombay’s various localities and celebrated structures.

Thank you for all your support, love, likes and enthusiasm!

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Sir JJ’s gift rooster?

28 November, 2016
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Motifs: Sir J.J. College of Architecture

78/3 Hornby Road (presently D.N. Road).

Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy’s gifts included hospitals, schools, animal shelters and museums and donations to innumerable charitable causes across the globe. He was the first Indian to be conferred a knighthood and baronetcy, in 1843 and 1858 respectively. The baronetcy possibly dulled the prospects of large-scale philanthropic activity by subsequent generations of the family. Descendants were required to wait to inherit the title at the death of their father, rather than actively work towards acquiring it.

Jejeebhoy died in 1859, a few years before the Fort walls were demolished to create a new city centre. His gifts were built on plots of land in areas like Byculla and Bhuleshwar. Today they seem conspicuous by their absence in the Fort.

On the other hand sethia David Sassoon’s legacy is imprinted in the Fort, despite his death in 1864, the year the Fort walls were finally demolished. His ambitious son Albert ensured that the institute his father had recently funded, was built on a prominent plot in the new city centre.

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Elephants’ day out

24 November, 2016
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Motifs: Lakshmi Building (1938)
Pherozeshah Mehta Road, Fort.

Monkeys weren’t the only ones enjoying a spot in the sun in the 1930s, elephants too were making their mark in the emerging and exciting landscape of Art Deco in Bombay.

Formerly, in Bombay’s grand Neo-Gothic buildings animals featured amid a host of plants, as densely ornamented flora and fauna. One had to strain and train the eye to locate each individual specimen.

With the coming of Art Deco in the 1930s, animals were freed and enjoyed a life of their own. They appeared muscular yet playful, echoing the current aesthetic, yet on their own terms, trunks and tails.

Photo by Rahul Patel.

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Matunga or Matheran?

12 November, 2016
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Motifs: Ganesh Baug

Plan 214, Matunga.

The locality of Matunga and the hill station of Matheran seem to have more than a bunch of cheeky monkeys in common.

As historian Nikhil Rao has shown, the migrants from South India who quickly populated the newly developed suburb of Matunga in the 1930s imagined Matunga as something of an island through which they could manage the ‘terrifying heterogeneity’ of the wider city. They set up a variety of recreational establishments in the locality such as meeting halls, gymkhanas and messes. As the first batch of residents, they felt Matunga offered an ‘uncontaminated’ environment, in which they could maintain their caste while simultaneously exploring their new status as ‘middle class’.

By the 1860s Bombay’s native elites were busy building and buying bungalows and setting up hotels in Matheran; promoting the hill station as the closest retreat to beat the Bombay heat. Honeymooners were also being wooed into visiting the ‘romantic sanitarium’. In April 1862, Dr Bhawoo Dajee spent a few days in Matheran with his friend Mungoldas Nathobhoy, at the ‘beautiful bungalow’ Nathobhoy had recently bought from Commodore Wellesley.

The inhabitants of both Matunga and Matheran imagined their permanent and seasonal homes as sanctuaries from the bustle of Bombay city life.

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We are 3

21 March, 2016
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Bombaywala logo-3rdAnniversary

Motifs: Bombaywalla

Bombaywalla turns three today! Thank you all for your continued support, suggestions and love. We have begun work on our book on Bombay’s Irani cafes for Roli Books and spend our days interviewing the cafes’ proprietors who are amongst the most colourful characters in the city.

As Humin Irani of Cosmopolitan Restaurant & Stores says, ‘That’s all my lord for today’.

Simin, Sitanshu, Hashim, Hersh and Dj.

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