Author Archives: admin

Local: 100 Years Of Indian Cinema

23 April, 2013
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http://mumbaimag.com/mumbais-film-studios/

100 Years Of Indian Cinema: A Look At Mumbai’s Film Studios Through The Years, MumbaiMag, April 23, 2013.

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Local: Celebrating 125 Years Of Mumbai’s Iconic Landmark

22 April, 2013
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http://mumbaimag.com/125-years-chhatrapati-shivaji-terminus/

Celebrating 125 Years Of Mumbai’s Iconic Landmark, The Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, MumbaiMag, April 22, 2013.

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From dabbas to a bhojnalaya in the Fort

22 April, 2013
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Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya

Flooring: Pradeep Gomantak Bhojnalaya (1970)
Sheri House, Gunbow Street, Fort (presently Rustom Sidhwa Marg).

Dashrath Pundalik Amonkar, proprietor of the Bhojnalaya (eating house), began his career in catering supplying dabbas (tiffins) to Maharashtrian migrants to Bombay. In 1970 he set up the Bhojnalaya, which can seat up to 25 customers.

An article from the newspaper Lokmat (displayed on premises) notes that the Bhojnalaya has a loyal and cosmopolitan clientele despite the presence of more elaborate eating houses in the Fort locality.

Prices ranges from Rs 60 for the Vegetarian Rice Plate to Rs 150 for the Pomplet Rice Plate.

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Portico: BB&CI Railway Administrative Offices (1899)

19 April, 2013
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BB&CI Railway Administrative Offices (1899)
Churchgate (presently Western Railway Head Office).

2013 is an important anniversary year for the Indian Railways and their structures. The first passenger train left Bombay for Thana on April 16th 1853, 160 years ago, hauled by three locomotives named Sindh, Sultan and Sahib.

The façade of the Bombay, Baroda & Central India (BB&CI) Railway Administrative Offices has been lit up this week in celebration (see our gallery above). A Google Doodle marks the 160 year anniversary.

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Messrs. Medows & Co.

15 April, 2013
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Medows Street, Fort

Signage: Medows Street, Fort
(presently Nagindas Master Road)

Medows Street holds the dubious distinction of the most corrupted street name in the city. Named after General Sir William Medows, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Bombay from 1788-90, the street was locally referred to as the Ingrez or Angrezi Bazaar since it housed a profusion of European shops. By the 1860s ‘Medows’ had been distorted to ‘Medow’ and subsequently ‘Meadow’ and ‘Meadows’.

The correct address can be found on the signboard of the Commercial Watch Company.

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